1904 Season

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1904 Season
Manager(s) Joseph W. Dusenbury, president
Will J. Dusenbury, manager
The Olentangy Park Company
Opening Day May 15, 1904 (Theater)
May 22, 1904 (Park)
Closing Day September 18, 1904 (Theater)
October 23, 1904 (Park)
New Attractions Ye Olde Mill or Auquarama
Circle Swing
Mystic Castle
Palace of Illusions
Penny Arcade
Down and Out
Pony Track
Greenhouse
The Colonnade
Ferris Wheels
Theater Manager W.W. Prosser
Band(s) Wendell S. Powell's Olentangy Band

The Olentangy Park, Theater, and Zoological Garden opened for the 1904 season on Sunday, May 22, 1904.[1][2] Around 30,000 people visited opening day.[3] Wendell S. Powell's Olentangy Band returned to play afternoon and evening performances.[4] The park was to open on May 15, 1904, but bad weather pushed the opening a week and the theater presented vaudeville.[5]

On Sunday, June 12, the park experienced its highest attendance of the season with around 40,000 parkgoers in one day.[6] By mid-September, president Joseph W. Dusenbury said the park saw around 750,000 attendees over the season and the average attendance was 50,000 paid admissions weekly. The Columbus Evening Dispatch suggested this was due to improvements, excursions, and better trolley service.[7]

The park's theater closed on September 18, 1904, and the park originally planned to close for the season on October 2, 1904,[7] and even featured H. Wallace's balloonists, aerialists, parachute jumpers, and high divers.[8] The managers decided to keep it open longer, closing the park around October 23, 1904.[9][10]

Park Improvements

The park expanded to comprise over 100 sq. acres. The Ball Grounds were enclosed and a large grandstand was added. The Dancing Pavilion and bowling alleys were enlarged and improved. Rare and interesting birds and animals were added to the zoo, growing it to be three times larger than the previous season.[4] The park spent over $50,000 (over $1.67 million in 2023) on improvements and new attractions park's opening[11] and $31,000 ($1,042,053 in 2023) during the season.[7]

For ride and attraction changes, see the Rides and Attractions section.

Passenger Station Restored

The park's passenger station blew down during a wind storm in the prior autumn. The Columbus Railway and Light Company restored the station using a concrete foundation that extended 5 feet into the ground.[12]

Injuries

Bear Attack

Peter Duffy, an attendant at the park's zoo, was attacked by a Himalayan bear when feeding the animals raw meat. Duffy was carrying the meat in a basket when the bear reached out of its cage to grab it. He became angry and opened the cage to confront the bear and take back the meat. The bear attacked Duffy causing lacerations all over his body. Other attendants saved Duffy, who survived.[13]

Lion Attack

James Emmett, an animal tamer, and his friend visited the zoo on May 31, 1904, and while walking by the cage with two untamed lions, tried to show how they sheathe their claws. Emmett grabbed a lion's paw and the lion used its other paw and claws to grab Emmett's hand and pull him further into the cage. Emmett's friend used his walking cane to beat the lion back. This aggravated the lion and it tore at Emmett's arm. The zoo keepers stepped in and used an iron bar to get the lion to let go. He survived and took the injuries in stride despite his friends urging him to go to a doctor for treatment. During the incident, park-goers ran and some fainted and rumor spread that the cage had broken.[14]

Lineman Knocked From Tree

Park lineman Charles Mayers was knocked from a tree while coming into contact with a live wire when working at the park in June.[15]

Court Cases

Hayes-Mackey Fence Dispute Ends in a Lease

Main Article: Hayes-Mackey v. The Olentangy Park Co.

Daniel H. Mackey leased a tract of land on the west side of High Street adjoining Olentangy Park to President Dusenbury for 10 years. Otho L. Hays leased a plot of land 462.37 by 584 feet on the west side of High Street adjoining the land in the first lease to the Olentangy Park Co., a corporation, also for 10 years. The leases began April 4, 1904, and April 12, 1904, respectively, at $500 ($16,674 in 2023) per year each, payable in four installments of $125 ($4,170 in 2023) each on the 15th day of May, June, July, and August.[16][7]

Brown Lawsuit

F.R. Brown sued J.W. Dusenbury for $108.60 ($3,622 in 2023) due for building materials.[17]

Tax Dispute

County commissioners visited Olentangy Park in late July, asking for property taxes. President Dusenbury said he paid taxes on the land he leased from Henry T. Chittenden, but he released them to the various amusement companies that owned the buildings for the attractions there and that they should pay those taxes. The commissioners said the taxes would be charged against Chittenden if they could not find the attractions' owners.[18]

Fence Lawsuit

The Page Woven Wire Fence Company sued J. W. Dusenbury and the Olentangy Park Company for $814.39 ($27,160 in 2023) due for labor and materials.[19]

Musicians' Union Labor Dispute

A dispute with the park management at the end of the season was not settled with local No. 103 of the American Federation of Musicians. The dispute was rooted in the fact that a non-union traveling band was employed to give a week's performance and engaged to reappear the next season. The union threatened to not play at the park unless they found a better solution.[20]

Rides and Attractions

New Colonnade

Main Article: Colonnade

The Colonnade was a 270-ft. (82.3 m) long building lined with columns and built to the east of the theater and offered refreshments and amusements."[4][21][7] It was constructed by J. W. Zarro, a show-goods manufacturer from Cincinnati.[22]

New Funhouses

The Mystic Castle, also called the Castle Mystic, this funhouse was described in the Columbus Sunday Dispatch as "full of mirth and mystery," while Palace of Illusions was "entertaining, mystifying, and instructive."[4] The House That Jack Built was also listed in an ad but could have been a name for one of the other funhouses.[23] They were also constructed by J. W. Zarro.[22]

Mystic Castle

Main Article: Mystic Castle

This new[7] attraction had the endless tunnel, the haunted swing, the rocky pass, the collapsable platform, the grotto, Kelly's slide, Jacob's ladder, the fountain of youth, the observatory, the magic mirror, the drunkard's pathway, Dooley's art gallery, the mysterious elevator, and other features.[21]

Palace of Illusions

Main Article: Palace of Illusions

This new[7] attraction had magical illusions, ghost shows, and other "weird and uncanny effects never before seen in Columbus."[21]

New Circle Swing

Main Article: Circle Swing

The new[7] Giant Circle Swing consisted of a 75-foot (23 m) tall steel tower (some sources say 90 feet (27.5 m)), which revolves around a vertical shaft. Connected to this shaft at the top of the tower were six radiating arms described as being "like spokes of a great wheel or legs of a gigantic spider. Steel cables extended from the arms to carry cars of passengers. An electric motor at the base spun the arms, cables, and cars with centrifugal force, raising the cars over 30 feet (9 m) above the ground at the full speed of 40 mph (64 kph). The circle created at its widest was 120 feet (36.5 m) in diameter. It was built by the North Penn Iron Company of Philadelphia and cost over $8,000 ($266,784 in 2023) to construct.[21] It opened to the public sometime during the week of July 31, 1904, after delays in building,[24] but the ride worked irregularly for the first few weeks.

New Down and Out

Main Article: Down and Out

The Down and Out was a type of slide that was a popular amusement park feature and was also at Steeplechase Park by 1903.[1]

New Greenhouse

Main Article: Floral Conservatory

Ground was broken for a new Greenhouse on September 13 to house flowers and plants to protect them from the winter frosts.[7]

New Ye Olde Mill or Auquarama

Main Article: Ye Olde Mill (First)

The new[7] Ye Olde Mill or Auquarama was a new water ride where boats with upholstered seats carry riders through "gloomy caverns, fantastic grottos, and unsurpassed scenery" with a torrent of water by an immense water wheel. After floating through subterraneous passages, they emerge into rooms containing electrically lighted scenic effects in scenes showing cotton plantations and Black musicians playing banjos. The next scene was based on Dante's Inferno with weird and ghostly effects, followed by "The Rock of Ages" with water flowing around a rock with a center of natural flowers. From there, riders pass through Arctic regions, then, under the sea with serpents and numerous "uncanny figures of every description." Mirrors were placed to enhance the immersive ride. The ride looped around to the start for the next set of riders. It was later often called the "Tunnel of Love."[21][25]

The ride was constructed under the supervision of C.B. and N.A. McDaniel of New York City and cost $15,000 (over $500,000 in 2023).[21]

Boathouse

Main Article: Boathouse

The Boathouse boats were swept away in a July 7 flood over the dam, landing near residences. Only 19 of the 22 boats were recovered by the next day. [26]

Zoo

Main Article: Zoological Garden

The zoo was expanded to be three times the size. One of the additions included a large pressed brick animal house.[21] A baby elk was born on September 11.[7] Plans were made to enlarge it further for the following season, using the newly acquired land.[7]

List of Rides and Attractions

Theater, Vaudeville, and Stunt Performances

Olentangy Park Theater

Main Article: Olentangy Park Casino and Theater

Vaudeville

Vaudeville returned for the 1904 season with two sets of performances daily throughout the season.[2] The Dusenbury Brothers made a deal with the Vaudeville Managers Association of America to obtain a vaudeville franchise for Columbus.[27] W.W. Prosser of Columbus was hired to manage the casino and J.K. Burke, former manager of Minerva Park, booked acts from New York.[28][27][4][29] Although the park's opening was moved due to poor weather, the theater season began on May 15.[5]

Week of May 15

Acts and performances:[30][31]

  • Frederick Bond and Co.
  • Soto Sunetaro, "The Great Japanese Wonder"
  • Mlle Latina, from Columbus, singer
  • Mooney and Holbein, Australian tourists, singing, dancing, and comedy
  • Georgia O'Ramey, comedy
  • Eddie Mack, dancing comedian and monologist, including the one-act comedy, "My Awful Dad"

The American Vitagraph showed pictures such as the great train robbery based on a real robbery on the Northern Pacific Railway.

Week of May 22

Acts and performances:[32][1]

  • The Beautiful Ballet Unique, singing and dancing by eight girls
  • Dixon, Bowers, and Dixon, in their famous "The Three Rubes" act
  • Smirl and Kessner, comedy acrobats, in a sketch, "The Bellboy and the Waiting Maid"
  • The Hollands, comedy acrobats
  • Eugene Wack, cornet soloist
  • Musical Bentley, xylophone player

The American Vitagraph showed new pictures.

Week of May 29

Acts and performances:[33][34]

  • Callahan and Mack, Irish comedy, in "The Old Neighborhood"
  • Frantzmathes and Lewis, rifle and pistol shooting
  • The Hollsworths, music and comedy
  • Loredo and Blake, comedy acrobats
  • Louis Granat, whistler
  • Reata Winfield, violin soloist
  • Farlardo, sound mimic
  • John Cartmell, black-face performer, "The Columbus Boy"

The American Vitagraph showed new pictures.

Week of June 5

Acts and performances:[35]

  • Will M. Cressy and Blanche Dayne in "Village Lawyer" or "The New Depot"
  • Duffy, Sawtelle, and Duffy in "Papa's Sweetheart"
  • Jones and Walton in "Our Country Cousin"
  • Claude and Fanny Usher, comedians, in "Tough Love"
  • Dorothy Kenton, banjoist, known as "The Girl with the Banjo"
  • Eugene Wack and Harry Davis, cornet and euphonium duet, assisted by the full concert band

The American Vitagraph showed new pictures.

Week of June 12

Acts and performances:[36]

  • Mr. and Mrs. Neil Litchfield in "Hollowe'en at Brook Farm," a comedy
  • Armstrong and Holly in "The Expressman," a comedy
  • Harry Stanley and Doris Wilson in a musical comedy sketch called "Before the Ball"
  • Don Gordon, comedy novel cyclist
  • Vera King, songs and stories
  • Ferguson and Beeson in "The Arrival of His Lordship," a comedy

The American Vitagraph showed new pictures.

Week of June 19

Acts and performances:[37][38]

  • Emma Littlefield and Victor Moore in "Change Your Act or Back to the Woods"
  • Cal Stewart, storyteller and entertainer
  • Brown and Bartoletti, comedians
  • Milt and Maude Wood, singing, dancing, and acrobatic sketches on boards
  • The Gagnoux, a famous European act with jugglers and equilibrists
  • Alice Lewis, singing comedienne
  • Dorothy Walters, singing and whistling comedienne[39]

The American Vitagraph showed new pictures by Hoyt Burnett.

Week of June 26

Acts and performances:[40]

  • Horace Vinton and Eda Clayton in the one-act comedy, "Bill Casey, Burglar"
  • Martini and Maximillian, known as "The Illusionists Extraordinary" or "Two Comical Trixters"
  • Raymond Finlay and Lottie Burke in "In Stageland Satire," a skit with singing, dancing, comedy, and wordplay
  • Billy Clifford, of Clifford and Huth, singer and dancer
  • Sophie Burnham, soprano
  • Kholer and Kholer, acrobats
  • Bud Farnam, Blackface comedian and musician[41]

The American Vitagraph showed new pictures and a rerun of "The Great Train Robbery."

Week of July 3

Acts and performances:[42]

  • Adelaide Herrmann, Queen of Magic, performed the "Magic of the Orient" and "The Sleeping Beauty or a Dream in Midair" with assistance from Adele Dewey
  • Curtis and Adams, German comedy
  • Bean and Hamilton, line barrel jumping
  • Dora Pelletier, singing, yodeling, and imitations
  • Lillian Shaw, singer
  • James B. Donovan, monologist, in an act called "The King of Ireland"

The American Vitagraph showed new pictures.

Week of July 10

Acts and performances:[43]

  • Emmet De Voy and Co. in "The Saintly Mr. Billings"
  • Burton and Brookes in their original comedy skit, "A Can of Humor"
  • Marlow Plunkett and Co. in "A Lesson in Shakespeare"
  • The Great Zamora Family in "El Trapezo Trio Alquimer"
  • A. O. Duncan, ventriloquist
  • Helen Ogden, southern classical vocalist
  • Tom Hardle, comedy acrobatic tramp act[44]

Week of July 17

Acts and performances:[45]

  • Zazell and Vernon, horizontal bar performers
  • Dick and Dick, a European pantomime act
  • Brooke Eltrym, the "Singer of Good Songs"
  • The Four Webbs, human bridge builders, made of three men and one woman
  • Crawford and Duffy, comedy sketch team
  • Frank Bowman, monologist and comedian

Week of July 24

Acts and performances:[46][47]

  • Mr. and Mrs. Edward Esmonde in "The Soldier of Propville," written by Si U. Collins
  • Borani and Nevaro in "Weary Waggles, the Dandy Dude Tramp"
  • The Three Poiriers, novelty ring and bar act
  • The Dorothea Sisters, singing and dancing
  • Chihuahua Mexican Troubadours, a singing trio
  • Baby Lund, singer
  • Rinaldo, juggling, feats of balancing, and hoop manipulating. His off-stage name was Clyde Rosebrough.

Week of July 31

Acts and performances:[24]

  • John and Maude Allison in a comedy sketch, "Minnie from Missouri"
  • The Saville Sisters, singing and dancing, including the Butterfly Dance
  • Borani and Nevaro in "Weary Waggles, the Dandy Dude Tramp"
  • Rinaldo, juggling, feats of balancing, and hoop manipulating
  • Halley and Meehan, blackface performers
  • Paul Barnes, monologue and songs
  • The Three Poiriers, novelty ring and bar act

Week of August 7

Acts and performances:[48]

  • George E. Boniface, Jr., and Bertha Waltzinger in a singing and comedy sketch called "The Woman Who Hesitates in Won"
  • Murphy and Williard in "Have a Doughnut"
  • Louise Henry, as the "Sal Skinner Girl," mimic and comedienne
  • Blanche Gibson, soprano
  • Kenyon and DeGarmo, gymnasts and balancers
  • The Three Madcaps, acrobatic dancers

Week of August 14

Acts and performances:[49]

  • Fred Vice and Emily Viola, comedy creators, in "The Tramp, the Hats and Her"
  • Blanche Gibson, soprano
  • The Three Ronaldos, contortionists
  • The Melrose Acrobats
  • Marshall and Lorrain, comedy duo
  • Mr. and Mrs. Alfrey Kelcy, comedy skit
  • Jimmy Castle and Tommy Collins, blackface comedians and dancers

Laura Deane, singing comedienne, was originally booked but did not perform.

Week of August 21

Acts and performances:[50]

  • The Sully Family in "An Interrupted Honeymoon," a comedy
  • Harris and Walters in "A Political Pull"
  • The Carter and Walters Co. starring Robert Carter, Katheryn Walters, and Willard Hester in "The Wise Mr. Conn"
  • Charles W. Leonard and Ethel Drake in "The Girl and the Gee"
  • Charles Carlos and his acting dogs (started August 22)
  • The Van Camps, magicians (started August 22)

Week of August 28

Acts and performances:[51]

  • Mary Dupont and Co. in her one-act play, "A Leap Year Leap," with the assistance of Willard Hutchinson
  • Hallen and Hughes, blackface performers and soft shoe dancers
  • Waldorf and Mendes, comedy acrobats
  • Dave Nowlin, monologist
  • Gladys Van, monologist and imitator
  • Brunnel and Kimberly, comedians
  • John Geiger, the Wizard of the Violin

Week of September 4

Acts and performances:[52][53]

  • Cal Stewart, "The Yankee Monologist"
  • The Gregsons, singing and dancing
  • Kohler and Kohler, comedy acrobats
  • Gladys Van, monologist and imitator
  • Patsy Doyle, known as the Dancing Doyle
  • F. Christopher, necromancer and magician

Week of September 11 (Closing Week)

Acts and performances:[54][55]

  • Fisher and Clarke, comedy acrobats
  • Nellie Burt, singing and dancing comedienne
  • The Tourist Trio, singing
  • The Pelots, comedy juggling
  • Anna Burt, wire walker
  • Russel and Dunbar, blackface performers
  • Ad Hoyt, blackface comedian
  • Rena Arnold (September 11-17)[56]
  • The Great Zamora Family (September 12-17)[57]
  • Waldorf and Mendes (September 18)
  • Howard and Linder (September 18)

Outdoor Performances and Stunts

On Sunday, July 24, Professor Donavin and his trained horse, "Glorious Moonshine," gave a free exhibition at the park.[58]

Music

Wendell S. Powell's Olentangy Band, with 30 musicians, returned to play afternoon and evening performances at both the theater and the Dancing Pavilion.[4][59] The open-air concerts were given at 4:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. and lasted an hour each.[60]

From September 7 through September 10, Creatore and his Italian band of 60 members played at the park.[61]Mme. Barili provided a soprano solo on September 8.[62] The cost of the tickets were 25 cents, 50 cents, 75 cents, and $1 ($8.40, $16.81, $25.21, and $33.61 in 2023, respectively). Matinee tickets were 25 and 50 cents.[63]

Activities

Ball Grounds

Main Article: Ball Grounds

The ball grounds were enclosed and a large grandstand was added. The park hired N.A. McCoy as the manager of the ball grounds, clubs, and teams from Columbus and the surrounding areas. There were games every day with special games on Sundays and holidays.[4]

List of Activities

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 "Real Opening Day at Olentangy Park Today." The Columbus Sunday Dispatch. 22 May 1904. Pg. 4.
  2. 2.0 2.1 "Vaudeville for Olentangy." Sunday Columbus Dispatch. 6 March 1904. Pg. 4.
  3. "Amusements: Olentangy Park." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 23 May 1904. Pg. 4.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8 "Grand Opening Olentangy Park, Theater and Zoo." The Columbus Sunday Dispatch. 24 April 1904. Pg. 4.
  5. 5.0 5.1 "Amusements: Olentangy Park" The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 20 May 1904. Pg. 4.
  6. "Amusements: Olentangy Park" The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 13 June 1904. Pg. 4.
  7. 7.00 7.01 7.02 7.03 7.04 7.05 7.06 7.07 7.08 7.09 7.10 7.11 "New Greenhouse, Baby Elk, Enlarged Zoo and Landscape Gardening." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 13 September 1904. Pg. 7.
  8. "Olentangy Theater." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 30 September 1904. Pg. 4.
  9. The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 9 October 1904. Pg. 4.
  10. Ad. The Columbus Sunday Dispatch. 23 October 1904. Pg. 4.
  11. "Grand Opening Olentangy Park, Theater and Zoo." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 25 April 1904. Pg. 4.
  12. "Olentangy Station Restored." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 10 May 1904. Pg. 10.
  13. "Peter Duffy has Narrow Escape from Angry Bear at the Olentangy Zoo." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 22 March 1904. Pg. 1.
  14. "Ferocious Young Lion Claws Hand of Tamer at Zoo." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 7 June 1904. Pg. 1.
  15. "Knocked From a Tree By a Live Wire." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 10 June 1904. Pg. 13.
  16. "Olentangy LEases Filed." The Columbus Sunday Dispatch. 12 June 1904. Pg. 7.
  17. The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 10 June 1904. Pg. 2.
  18. "Somebody Must Pay." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 26 July 1904. Pg. 10.
  19. The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 31 August 1904. Pg. 6.
  20. "Against the Shop." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 2 November 1904. Pg. 5.
  21. 21.0 21.1 21.2 21.3 21.4 21.5 21.6 "Olentangy Park, a Coney Island Rival" The Columbus Sunday Dispatch. 1 May 1904. Pg. 4.
  22. 22.0 22.1 The Billboard. 23 April 1904. Vol. 16. Issue 17. Pg. 8.
  23. Ad. The Columbus Sunday Dispatch. 24 April 1904. Pg. 4.
  24. 24.0 24.1 "Summer Amusements." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 31 July 1904. Pg. 4.
  25. Barret, Richard E. "Olentangy Park: Four Decades of Fun." Columbus and Central Ohio Historian. Vol. 1. April 1984. Pg. 11.
  26. "Out for Salvage." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 8 July 1904. Pg. 3.
  27. 27.0 27.1 "Vaudeville at Olentangy." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 20 March 1904. Pg.4.
  28. "Notes." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 17 March 1904. Pg.4.
  29. "Summer Parks Open." The Columbus Sunday Dispatch. 15 May 1904. Pg.4.
  30. "Olentangy Theater." The Sunday Columbus Dispatch. 8 May 1904. Pg. 4.
  31. "Olentangy Park: Bill for the Opening." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 10 May 1904. Pg. 4.
  32. "Amusements: Olentangy Park." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 22 May 1904. Pg. 4.
  33. "'The Old Neighborhood' Headliner at Olentangy." The Columbus Sunday Dispatch. 29 May 1904. Pg. 4.
  34. Ad. The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 30 May 1904. Pg. 9.
  35. "Cressy and Dayne at Olentangy Theater." The Columbus Sunday Dispatch. 5 June 1904. Pg. 4.
  36. "Summer Amusements." The Columbus Sunday Dispatch. 12 June 1904. Pg. 4.
  37. "Summer Amusements." The Columbus Sunday Dispatch. 19 June 1904. Pg. 4.
  38. "Amusements: Olentangy Theater." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 20 June 1904. Pg. 4.
  39. "Amusements: Olentangy Theater." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 23 June 1904. Pg. 4.
  40. "Summer Amusements." The Columbus Sunday Dispatch. 26 June 1904. Pg. 4.
  41. "Amusements: Olentangy Theater." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 27 June 1904. Pg. 4.
  42. "Summer Amusements." The Columbus Sunday Dispatch. 3 July 1904. Pg. 4.
  43. "Summer Amusements." The Columbus Sunday Dispatch. 10 July 1904. Pg. 4.
  44. "Amusements: Duncan is a Hit." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 12 July 1904. Pg. 4.
  45. "Summer Amusements." The Columbus Sunday Dispatch. 17 July 1904. Pg. 4.
  46. "Summer Amusements." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 23 July 1904. Pg. 4.
  47. The Columbus Sunday Dispatch. 24 July 1904. Pg. 4.
  48. "Summer Amusements." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 8 August 1904. Pg. 4.
  49. "Summer Amusements." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 15 August 1904. Pg. 4.
  50. The Columbus Sunday Dispatch. 21 August 1904. Pg. 4.
  51. The Columbus Sunday Dispatch. 28 August 1904. Pg. 4.
  52. The Columbus Sunday Dispatch. 4 September 1904. Pg. 4.
  53. "Olentangy Theater." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 5 September 1904. Pg. 4.
  54. The Columbus Sunday Dispatch. 11 September 1904. Pg. 4-5.
  55. "Olentangy Theater." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 13 September 1904. Pg. 4.
  56. The Billboard. 17 September 1904. Vol. 16. Issue 38. Pg. 15.
  57. The Billboard. 17 September 1904. Vol. 16. Issue 38. Pg. 16.
  58. The Columbus Sunday Dispatch. 24 July 1904. Pg. 8.
  59. "Olentangy Park: Its Many Attractions." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 3 May 1904. Pg.4.
  60. "Amusements: Olentangy Park, Theater, and Zoological Garden." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 9 July 1904. Pg.4.
  61. "Olentangy Theater." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 27 August 1904. Pg. 4.
  62. "Mme. Barili Will Sing." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 8 September 1904. Pg. 7.
  63. "Olentangy Theater." The Columbus Evening Dispatch. 6 September 1904. Pg. 4.